A study published in 2013 1 established that DNase could inhibit biofilms created by G. vaginalis.

Gardnerella vaginalis biofilms contain extracellular DNA, an essential element of their structure. Enzymes are able to disrupt this DNA and inhibit the biofilm, both in new and established biofilms. DNase liberates bacteria from the biofilm, where antimicrobials or antibiotics can then kick in and kill the planktonic bacteria.

What is DNase?

DNase is short for deoxyribonuclease, and is an enzyme that degrades DNA. There are many versions of DNases. They all cleave (or ‘cut’) the DNA strand at some point.

DNase in other applications besides BV

DNase enzymes are inhaled by some cystic fibrosis sufferers, which helps because white blood cells accumulate in the mucous, and when they break down, they release DNA – this makes mucous stickier. DNase breaks down the DNA, making it easier to clear from the lungs.

Lung drainage is assisted for other lung conditions in combination with other medications.

Where do I buy DNase?

You can’t. DNase is not easy to find, and is not packaged up for vaginal use. It is at this time purely scientific in nature, and is not sold to the public. It costs about US$200 for 100mg. While it might sound tempting to get hold of some, we do not advise attempting to use DNase in your vagina, since this is the only study, and there is no dosages, and it was not tested in humans.

There is no doubt there are some clinical trials underway to get a BV treatment using DNase, but for now, we just have to wait.

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  1. Journal of Infectious Diseases. May2013, Vol. 207 Issue 10, p1491-1497. 7p., DNase Inhibits Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms In Vitro and In Vivo, Hymes, Saul R., Randis, Tara M.Sun, Thomas YangRatner, Adam J.

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